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June 28, 2017

Is Egypt the First Domino to Fall?

After almost a month of protests and people living in the streets, rocks being thrown, blood being spilled, and many injured, Egyptian President Mubarak finally resigns. There was partying and cheers from the streets all night. The people had spoken and the people had won. The basis of any democracy is a government for the people and by the people.

Go back to the 2009 Iranian elections, where Mahmoud Ahmadinejad was reelected, but not without a controversial victory. Much like Egypt but under different circumstances, people flooded the streets in protest, claiming that the vote was fixed and that voter fraud was the reason why Ahmadinejad was thrust back into office.

Unfortunately there was also bloodshed and deaths. The Iranian ruling party tried to cover up their handling of this situation by not allowing the news media or cameras into the area. What they didn’t factor in was the Internet age of Twitter and the social network. Their atrocities were seen all over the world from cell phones and computers. It was called the “Twitter Revolution”, but unfortunately it ended in the people being run off the streets and back into their homes by the force of the Iranian military.

Now we come back to today, and right after the Egyptian conflict, the Iranian people are back in the streets and they are wanting a change. Will they succeed this time? We will just have to wait and see what comes from all this, but one thing is for sure, Iran’s president, Ahmadinejad, can’t keep blaming the U.S. for all its internal problems. At some point he is going to have to step up to the plate and admit that his people don’t want him or his way of ruling the country.

Are we starting to see a domino effect with these uprisings? Are there more Islamic countries that are in danger of this exact kind of reaction from its people?

I am a businessman and I use the Internet to market my business . The Internet has been a tremendous tool for companies all across the globe and now we are seeing new things that the Internet has a function for. If it wasn’t for the Internet, these people in these very closed and restricted countries would never have an opportunity to hear the truth and see what is really going on in the world. The Internet has given them the ability to access the news from anywhere around the world, and this is a good thing.

These corrupt governments, who want to force their ways and views down the people throats, have always used the cloak of secrecy, trying to keep or shade the truth from the people and use this lack of knowledge to control and manipulate everyone and promote their agendas. This was true of Hitler and every other evil dictator that has been drunk with power, and control.

Freedom can never be controlled and locked up in a prison, it always will find a way to escape, and many think that this is just the beginning. Other oppressed people will join the cry for freedom and like Egypt and Iran, be running through the streets in an effort to reclaim their nation and their lives.
egypt-protests
I think with all that is going on right now, we are seeing a very different side of these regimes. They claim freedom and fairness, but pictures and the voice of truth show a different story and their escape of responsibility by pointing their accusing fingers at America, and others, for all their short comings, is wearing very thin. The whole world is seeing what they are really made up of.

Is this a good thing? It all depends on who takes the reins of power and control next. The Islamic Brotherhood was involved in the Egyptian protests and wants to be involved in the next ruling party. This group is the world’s oldest and largest Islamic political group and calls itself conservative and non-violent. It condemns terrorism and the 911 attacks, but others say it is a terrorist organization with ties to Al-Qaeda.

Is Egypt the first domino to fall in this long line of dominoes? Only time will tell, but like it or not, the world is watching.

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